Gardening – Clarence House Hotel http://clarencehouse-hotel.co.uk/ Tue, 19 Jul 2022 03:11:54 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://clarencehouse-hotel.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2021/03/cropped-clarencehouse-hotel-32x32.png Gardening – Clarence House Hotel http://clarencehouse-hotel.co.uk/ 32 32 Veterans Celebrate 50th Anniversary of Service at Durango Botanical Gardens – The Durango Herald https://clarencehouse-hotel.co.uk/veterans-celebrate-50th-anniversary-of-service-at-durango-botanical-gardens-the-durango-herald/ Tue, 19 Jul 2022 03:11:54 +0000 https://clarencehouse-hotel.co.uk/veterans-celebrate-50th-anniversary-of-service-at-durango-botanical-gardens-the-durango-herald/ Members of the USS Edwards gather to commemorate their time in Vietnam On Monday, members of the USS Edwards tour the Literary Gardens portion of the Durango Botanical Gardens. (Tyler Brown/Durango Herald) The former service members visited the Durango Botanical Gardens on Monday to celebrate the 50th anniversary of their service on the USS Edwards […]]]>

Members of the USS Edwards gather to commemorate their time in Vietnam

On Monday, members of the USS Edwards tour the Literary Gardens portion of the Durango Botanical Gardens. (Tyler Brown/Durango Herald)

The former service members visited the Durango Botanical Gardens on Monday to celebrate the 50th anniversary of their service on the USS Edwards in Vietnam.

Veterans and their partners strolled through the newly added Literary Gardens to enjoy a day in the sun.

All four members were Navy fire control technicians on the USS Edwards. The group has visited different locations across the country to celebrate over the past 22 years.

“Basically a couple guys on the East Coast thought it would be cool if we all got together, so they started sending emails announcing when and where we were getting together,” the Navy veteran said. Don Sims.

The group chose Durango because it was a central location to where they were all from. The veterans came from states across the country, including California, West Virginia, Washington and Oklahoma.

Sims said there were 260 members in the group, many of whom wanted to go to San Diego. But the group had been to San Diego before, and others wanted to explore somewhere new, making Durango a timely destination.

Although others were reluctant to visit Durango, the group was happy with their decision. The group was blown away by all the activities Durango had to offer on such a small scale.

They spent an hour touring the gardens with the guides from the Botanical Garden where they asked questions and learned about the different flowers and plants. The Sims liked the layout of the garden and how well organized it was, while another veteran, Ben Smith, obsessed over a used container in the garden.

“I like the container because now I know what I can buy at home to play with the tomatoes,” he said.

After enjoying all the gardens had to offer, veterans sat around picnic tables to talk about their history while sharing a few laughs.

Navy veteran Ben Smith examines the fuel garden container during his tour of the Durango Botanical Gardens on Monday. (Tyler Brown/Durango Herald)

When asked if he could share any interesting stories from his service, Navy veteran Worthy Paul jokingly replied, “None that we can tell.”

Paul found it interesting that most people don’t know the Navy was involved in the Vietnam War. He shared stories of long nights involved in fights on the water.

“We were shooting at them and they (shooting at us) all night long,” he said. “We had this thing called an observation pilot and he was flying low to give us the coordinates to shoot, and our job was to follow his coordinates and shoot at that location.”

He said this type of combat happened every night in the navy, which made him grateful for peacetime.

“No matter how hot it is today, it’s still not that hot,” Paul said. “Where ammunition is stored below decks, there’s purposely no ventilation. So when you cross that deck to load ammo, you start sweating just standing there.

Smith shared a story of falling asleep behind a gun rack while shooting.

“We worked so many hours, I fell asleep behind a gun and they fired I don’t know how many shots, and I didn’t wake up. That’s probably why I use hearing aids now,” he said.

Guides discuss the different types of vegetation on the trail to the Durango Botanical Gardens. (Tyler Brown/Durango Herald)

Barbara Johnson, director of marketing for the Durango Botanical Gardens, said welcoming veterans was special.

“The tours are so important because they really introduce people to the gardens, what we do, that we’re here for the education,” she said.

tbrown@durangoherald.com

]]>
We have official state soil | Master Gardener | Home and garden https://clarencehouse-hotel.co.uk/we-have-official-state-soil-master-gardener-home-and-garden/ Sat, 16 Jul 2022 20:19:00 +0000 https://clarencehouse-hotel.co.uk/we-have-official-state-soil-master-gardener-home-and-garden/ Did you know that there is a state ground, just like the state flower (the poppy) and the state animal (the bear)? Yes, the soil in the state of California is called “San Joaquin” soil and was officially designated as such in 1997. The Central Valley has over one million acres of “San Joaquin” soil. […]]]>

Did you know that there is a state ground, just like the state flower (the poppy) and the state animal (the bear)? Yes, the soil in the state of California is called “San Joaquin” soil and was officially designated as such in 1997. The Central Valley has over one million acres of “San Joaquin” soil. This is not surprising as our main export from the valley is food and other agricultural products. But I’m sure the land appreciates being recognized for its importance to California’s well-being.

Soil (please don’t call it earth) is a complex world made up of organic matter like insects and worms and decaying plants, minerals of various sizes (more on this important feature later), air and water. In this article, I would like to talk about this vital part of the garden. I take some of my information from the excellent book The Home Orchard by C. Ingels, P. Geisel and M. Norton, published by the University of California. It is highly recommended for people who have deciduous fruit and nut trees (i.e. they lose their leaves in the fall). It is one of the books often used by master gardeners to educate the public and in their own orchards. I also refer those interested in this and other gardening topics to the Integrated Pest Management site (http://ipm.ucanr.edu/) maintained by the University of California for Agriculture and Natural Resources. This site is a mine of information on all things gardening.

The ground is made up of layers called Horizons, each with unique characteristics that differ from the others. The upper horizon is called the topsoil. This soil is usually dark and is made up of living things like insects and worms, fungi and bacteria that co-exist with plants and can most often help them. It also contains decaying organic matter that nourishes the plant. Topsoil is not very deep, several inches to a few feet, and is home to the majority of plant roots. Beneath the topsoil is the subsoil horizon which accumulates leached clay particles, minerals and salts. It contains less organic matter and houses the deep roots of plants like trees. The lowest horizon is called the regolith and is made up of rocks and has little organic matter available. The roots are not in this layer. So in your gardening, unless there has been deep plowing or digging that has disturbed these horizons, topsoil is what you should be working with.

Soil minerals are defined by their size. Sand particles are large enough to be seen with the naked eye. Silt particles are considered “medium” in size and are too small to see individually. Clay particles are so small that they can only be seen under a microscope. The texture of a soil is made up of the relative proportions of these three quantities. Soil scientists have defined 12 types of textures and put them in a diagram that gives relative percentages of different particles. This complex image is a start for people concerned with understanding soil types, but an easier way that anyone can learn and use is called the “feel test” for soil texture. There are many resources on how to do this test, but for those who are “visual learners”, like me, I will refer to the great You-tube video from Kansas State University Research and Extension: https:// www.youtube.com com/watch?v=UKT9RBIkeKc

This video will show you how to test your soil for a rough estimate of soil texture and is also great if you fancy playing in the mud.

Soil can present many physical and chemical problems. A major topic is the pH, ie the degree of acidity or alkalinity of the soil. An inexpensive kit for testing pH is widely available at most nurseries and home improvement centers. It offers simple tests for pH, nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium. Advisors Jim Downer and Ben Faber of Ventura County Extension tested five commercially available kits against results obtained by UC Davis Analytical Laboratory. The results are described in their article (https://ucanr.edu/sites/ucceventura/files/35923.pdf), but the bottom line is that home test kits such as Rapidtest™ are easy to use and are more 90% correct.

The soil may also have an excess of salts and elements like sodium, boron or chloride. There are soil labs in our area that can give a more complete analysis. If you really want to know the details of your soil composition, call your local California Extension office for a referral. If you have soil that is impossible to amend or contaminated with chemicals, you can still have healthy plants by putting them in raised beds.

So be good to your state soil here in the San Joaquin Valley by testing, amending with compost if necessary, and using mulch to retain moisture and reduce weeds.

Master Gardeners will be available to answer your questions in a few select locations over the next few months!

Visalia Farmer’s Market – 1st and 3rd Saturday, 8 a.m. to 11 a.m., 2100 W. Caldwell Ave (behind Sears)

Hanford Farmers Market – 4th Thursday – 5-9pm

Call us: Master Gardeners in Tulare County: (559) 684-3325, Tuesday and Thursday, 9:30-11:30 a.m.; Kings County: (559) 852-2736, Thursdays only, 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m.

Instagram at: @mgtularekings

]]>
Take the time to admire the water lilies in the garden of the master gardener https://clarencehouse-hotel.co.uk/take-the-time-to-admire-the-water-lilies-in-the-garden-of-the-master-gardener/ Thu, 14 Jul 2022 21:07:53 +0000 https://clarencehouse-hotel.co.uk/take-the-time-to-admire-the-water-lilies-in-the-garden-of-the-master-gardener/ A stop on the Master Gardening Central Bog Bridge can transport the viewer to Giverny, France. Looking down from the top of the bridge and over the ponds, Monet’s famous water lily paintings seem to come to life. The colorful flower gems float like water nymph crowns, but they’re actually suspended and held upright by […]]]>

A stop on the Master Gardening Central Bog Bridge can transport the viewer to Giverny, France. Looking down from the top of the bridge and over the ponds, Monet’s famous water lily paintings seem to come to life. The colorful flower gems float like water nymph crowns, but they’re actually suspended and held upright by sturdy stems.

According to Texas A&M AgriLife Extension, there are several native species of water lilies or “lily-like” species found in our ponds, lakes, and ditches throughout the spring and summer: the American water lily (nymphaea odorata), the yellow water lily (mexican nymphaeum) and the blue water lily (Nymphaea elegans). But here at The Bog, our ponds are populated with hardy, hybrid water lilies.

Rustic water lilies (water lily) are cold-resistant perennials with about 50 species, and among them even more cultivars are grown. Their colors can be all nuanced shades of the rainbow. Flowers and pads vary in shapes and sizes, petal length and arrangements.

One of the most photographed flowers in the world, water lilies are not only beautiful and bewitching, but the round, flat water lilies provide protection for our goldfish. They keep algae under control and the water temperature is stabilized by isolating the water from temperature variations. During the terrible heat of July and August, they still bloom happily every sunny day, gradually opening each morning and slowly closing as the sun sets.

Water lilies are typically sold in pots 8 to 10 inches deep, 12 to 20 inches in diameter, and contain heavy loam or clay loam soil rather than light garden soil that can easily float. The crown of the plant is placed on the surface of the soil and held in place with fine gravel. The pots can be lowered a few inches below the water surface and to a depth of 8 to 12 inches. Water lilies sitting on stones or bricks in layers will achieve the depth required by each variety of water lily. The best part about growing water lilies is that water gardens can be created with any 15 to 25 gallon container.

To keep plants healthy and in full bloom, water lily fertilizer is applied in tablets, usually 1-2 per month during the growing season, depending on the size of the plant. Pond tablets are found in the aquatic section of nurseries and are pressed onto the surface of topsoil just below the gravel. Water lilies are a little carefree. Old or damaged leaves are removed along with any other decaying debris. Keep the pond shaded with water lilies and algae growth will be less. The plants need 6 hours of sun and space to propagate, so no overcrowding! Keep pond water fresh and replenished up to 18 inches or to the bottom of your container.

So stay cool this summer and stop by the bog garden to admire what Monet painted hundreds of times and the water flowers that have fascinated the world throughout history.

For answers to your gardening questions, please visit Montgomery County Master Gardeners at www.mcmga.com or call 936-539-7824. Master Gardener members are available to assist you weekdays from 8 a.m. to noon and 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. at the A&M AgriLife Montgomery County Extension Offices located at 9020 Airport Road, Conroe, Texas 77301.

]]>
Joyce Block: Wildfires, burn bans and gardening | Local News https://clarencehouse-hotel.co.uk/joyce-block-wildfires-burn-bans-and-gardening-local-news/ Tue, 12 Jul 2022 20:30:00 +0000 https://clarencehouse-hotel.co.uk/joyce-block-wildfires-burn-bans-and-gardening-local-news/ While returning from a trip to Dallas last week, I noticed a huge plume of smoke as I arrived in Duncanville. I thought it was a fire west of Alvarado. I got an alert phone call from the town of Alvarado, but it didn’t come. It was after I got home that I saw there […]]]>

While returning from a trip to Dallas last week, I noticed a huge plume of smoke as I arrived in Duncanville. I thought it was a fire west of Alvarado. I got an alert phone call from the town of Alvarado, but it didn’t come.

It was after I got home that I saw there was a huge fire near Farm-to-Market Route 3136. Johnson County Emergency Management called in air tankers to bring the fire under control.

The Johnson County Commissioners Court voted for a burning ban on June 17 that will expire on September 14. Our drought conditions continue. There was also a declaration of disaster due to the threat of forest fires filed on June 29.

Although there were a few random rain showers in the county, nothing measurable fell. At Cleburne Airport, there has been no measurable rain since May. According to the National Weather Service, we may only have an occasional storm over the next week.

Just an example of the extent of these storms – on Saturday I had thunder, but no rain. While my mother-in-law from Grandview had 0.22 inches, another master gardener friend had wind, hail and driving rain.

Lake levels are beginning to drop, Lake Pat Cleburne is down six feet while Lake Whitney is down five and a half feet. While many “new” Texans wonder what’s going on, those of us who are natives or have been here a while understand that heat and drought occur in a cycle. So what’s a gardener to do?

First of all, in Texas we can still harvest rainwater. Unlike other states, it has not been declared illegal. Even a small amount of rain can fill a rain barrel, or even a bucket when placed under the eaves of your home. I have two 55 gallon drums that we have had for years. We redid them a few years ago, but I have about seventy gallons of rainwater left. Building a rain barrel is easy, find a food grade barrel, drill, outdoor faucet, plumber’s tape and saw.

Instructions are at tamu.edu/media/making a rain barrel. Using contractor grade pipe and setting one barrel on two levels of cement blocks and the other on bricks allows the water to drain by gravity.

Yes, I believe we will have rain this fall, even with La Nina in charge. I use the water for areas where I don’t have a soaker pipe, a bed of weeds.

Second, mulch, mulch and mulch. Wood mulch, grass clippings and straw are great ways to control weeds in your gardens. The other benefit is that they retain moisture around the root zones of your plants.

Third, soaker pipes or drip irrigation will put the water where it is needed. Especially when we have water restrictions for irrigation systems. Currently, many cities restrict watering between 10 a.m. and 6 p.m.

Watering by hand with a hose, or watering can be done outside these hours. Many cities also limit the use of irrigation systems to twice a week. Check your local city or Johnson County Water District for more information.

Fourth, plant native and adapted plants. Unfortunately, many vegetables are not in this classification and require about an inch of water per week. Reduce that watering to a long, low, slow watering a few times a week and your tomatoes should survive. More on fall gardening next week!

Salvias, crape myrtles, irises and daylilies are some of the hardiest plants you can plant. I have an Iris bed that only gets rainwater, and they are doing well, as are my Salvias. We just gave the Crape Myrtles a long slow drink as they were stressed. The leaves were curling up and falling off the plant. If this continues to happen, the plants should be fine. When we get rain in the forecast, a high percentage, add fertilizer to the area around them to help them recover.

For more information, visit the Texas Agri Life Extension website and tamu.edu for information on how to conserve the water we have.

In the meantime, stay cool, be safe, be healthy, and keep gardening.

Joyce Block is a master gardener in Johnson County and tries gardening in Alvarado.

]]>
Go Green: Vegetable gardening can help feed families, say local farmers | New https://clarencehouse-hotel.co.uk/go-green-vegetable-gardening-can-help-feed-families-say-local-farmers-new/ Mon, 11 Jul 2022 04:13:19 +0000 https://clarencehouse-hotel.co.uk/go-green-vegetable-gardening-can-help-feed-families-say-local-farmers-new/ Although not the best time to start a garden, summer is a good time to start planning a fall and spring garden. It was among the many treats Shane and Liz Caraway of Pippa Hill Farms in Oglesby shared during a free gardening class on Saturday at the Temple Public Library. Jenniffer Hentzen, head of […]]]>

Although not the best time to start a garden, summer is a good time to start planning a fall and spring garden. It was among the many treats Shane and Liz Caraway of Pippa Hill Farms in Oglesby shared during a free gardening class on Saturday at the Temple Public Library.

Jenniffer Hentzen, head of adult services at the library, welcomed around 50 people gathered in the McLane room.

“We’re going to have more events like this,” she said. “Tell your friends.”

Liz Caraway said she and her husband typically teach these classes at their farm, a commercial gardening operation in Coryell County.

“One of our passions is teaching people how to grow their own food,” she said.

Beware, she says, because gardening is hard, difficult and time-consuming.

“Go small at first,” she said. “A lot of beginner gardeners want to grow everything. Choose two or three things.

Shane told the class to research the space they needed. They could start with tomatoes, peppers and squash, he said. Do not start with pumpkins, which will take over the whole garden.

They both recommended keeping a garden notebook. Gardeners need to know what they planted, when they planted it, and when it will be ready. For example, with a watermelon, he says, it’s hard to tell what’s inside, so the gardener needs to know when it’s due.

As for the types of gardening, he said raised beds are very popular now. The Caraways make a hybrid, he says. They start by turning the earth and then lift it about a foot.

One of the problems with a raised bed, he said, is that it tends to dry out faster.

Liz provided guidance on choosing a garden location. The general rule is to have full sun, but peppers, for example, do well in shade.

“Don’t put your garden near a lot of trees or bushes because they’re going to soak up a lot of your water,” she said.

Once the location is chosen, the gardener must think about what to grow, she said. Zucchini is a big producer, as is cantaloupe, she said.

Buying 30 tomato plants is a big mistake, she says.

“It will overwhelm you.”

Three to five plants will do more than feed a family, she said.

Gardeners may need to add topsoil, Shane said.

“You want to build your floor, something you can do over the years,” he said.

The work leaves in the ground, or the manure – but not the pig manure, he said, because it’s “too hot”. Rather than fresh, he says, the manure should be aged a bit, until it looks like dust.

“Improve your soil and keep improving it year after year,” he said.

Crop rotation helps improve garden soil, Liz said.

“Some vegetables take things out and some vegetables put things in,” she said.

Mushroom compost and alfalfa hay are good soil amendments, they said.

“If you start seeing earthworms in your garden, you’re doing something good,” he said.

The Caraways strongly recommend drip irrigation. Sprinkler systems waste a lot of water, he said, as do dripping pipes. With drip irrigation, the holes are spaced 4 inches apart, he said, providing a constant flow of water.

]]>
Gardening with Allen: Topping weakens trees https://clarencehouse-hotel.co.uk/gardening-with-allen-topping-weakens-trees/ Sat, 09 Jul 2022 13:05:14 +0000 https://clarencehouse-hotel.co.uk/gardening-with-allen-topping-weakens-trees/ gardening specialist in Vancouver.”/> Allen Wilson is a gardening specialist in Vancouver. Email Allen Wilson at allenw98663@yahoo.com. Photo We planted two maple trees near our house 15 years ago that grew to over 50 feet tall. We are worried that they will break and damage our house during a storm. A friend with a chainsaw […]]]>

We planted two maple trees near our house 15 years ago that grew to over 50 feet tall. We are worried that they will break and damage our house during a storm. A friend with a chainsaw says he can cut them down by about a third. Is it a good idea?

Arbitrarily shortening all the branches of a mature tree is called “topping”. Garnishing is never a good idea. Simply reducing the height of a large tree does not make it safer. In fact, improper pruning can make a large tree even more dangerous. The trees will respond by rapidly returning to their normal mature size within a year or two. But there will be a burst of five to 10 times more thin, weaker branches that will be loosely attached and much more easily snapped in a storm. It will take much less wind to knock them down.

Wounds created by crushing large branches are more prone to infection by insects and disease. Some of them will die, creating an even bigger target for the infection. The multitude of small branches growing like a witch’s broomstick from the top of large bare branches destroys the natural shape and beauty of the tree.

If you are concerned about wind damage to trees, the best way to prune them is to open them up by removing some of the inner branches so the wind can blow through the trees more easily. This practice is often called “wind sailing” because it allows the wind to pass through with less resistance. Inward or upward growing branches are removed, leaving outward growing branches.

While there are good reasons to reduce the height of large trees, they can usually be reduced by up to 20% with proper pruning. Larger branches can be shortened into a side branch that is at least one-third the size of the shortened branch. This is sometimes referred to as the “inseam” size. The crotch is the point where two legs connect. If the main branches are simply cut to an arbitrary length without considering the side branches, serious damage can occur. If a weak or damaged branch does not have proper side branches, it is best to remove it completely back to its origin.

]]>
Gardens Mall Summer Wellness https://clarencehouse-hotel.co.uk/gardens-mall-summer-wellness/ Wed, 06 Jul 2022 19:27:18 +0000 https://clarencehouse-hotel.co.uk/gardens-mall-summer-wellness/ Yoga at Nordstrom Court. Photo courtesy of The Gardens Mall The Gardens Mall will host the return of Namaste at The Gardens, a wellness-focused fitness, fashion and entertainment campaign this summer July 9-23 at various locations, featuring free fitness and yoga classes, healthy food demonstrations, chakra-focused experiences, juice bars, and more. In the mall’s Grand […]]]>
Yoga at Nordstrom Court. Photo courtesy of The Gardens Mall

The Gardens Mall will host the return of Namaste at The Gardens, a wellness-focused fitness, fashion and entertainment campaign this summer July 9-23 at various locations, featuring free fitness and yoga classes, healthy food demonstrations, chakra-focused experiences, juice bars, and more.

In the mall’s Grand Court, customers can take part in fitness classes by Pure Barre and Palm Beach Sports Club, learn exercises at Peloton demonstrations, and follow yoga sessions by YogaSix and Ignite Your Sunshine. At the Style Club, participate in assisted stretching with StretchZone, take interactive chakra-focused classes with Aveda, and learn skincare and sunscreen tips from Bloomingdale’s and Sephora.

Williams-Sonoma Vitamix Demo.  Photo courtesy of The Gardens Mall
Williams-Sonoma Vitamix Demo. Photo courtesy of The Gardens Mall

“Namaste at The Gardens is back and better than ever, and people can be healthy and active in a variety of ways,” said Whitney Pettis Jester, Marketing and Merchant Relations Manager at Gardens Mall. “Our customers might be surprised to learn that we offer wellness advice beyond retail therapy.”

Other Gardens Mall wellness initiatives include relaxing in-store aromatherapy at Lush; healthy smoothies and summer mocktails in Williams-Sonoma; and shopping nights at Athleta, Fabletics and Lululemon.

For the full list of summer wellness events and schedules, click here.

]]>
Cultivating School Gardens conference scheduled for July 20 | https://clarencehouse-hotel.co.uk/cultivating-school-gardens-conference-scheduled-for-july-20/ Tue, 05 Jul 2022 04:45:00 +0000 https://clarencehouse-hotel.co.uk/cultivating-school-gardens-conference-scheduled-for-july-20/ The Cultivating School Gardens conference will be held online on July 20. The conference is designed to teach participants tools, techniques and new ideas for using gardening and natural learning environments in classrooms and gardens. The Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service event will take place from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Cost is $30 and […]]]>

The Cultivating School Gardens conference will be held online on July 20. The conference is designed to teach participants tools, techniques and new ideas for using gardening and natural learning environments in classrooms and gardens.

The Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service event will take place from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Cost is $30 and pre-registration is required at https://tx.ag/CSGC22Reg.

The conference will be held on the Microsoft Teams meeting platform. Once registered, a link to register will be emailed to you several days before the event.

This event will provide seven hours of Texas Education Agency-recognized continuing professional education hours.

“We are very excited about this school garden conference, which brings together the basics of gardening, including where and what to plant, with the inner workings of funding, curriculum and other resources,” said Ginger Easton Smith, AgriLife Agriculture Extension and Natural Resources Officer for Aransas County.

The event is organized and facilitated by a multi-county panel of AgriLife Extension agents and specialists. The virtual workshop will provide educators with the information needed to start a youth or school garden. It will cover preparation, support, planting and care, and success stories.

“It’s being showcased virtually to make it available statewide because there’s such interest in gardening,” she said.

At the end of the conference, door prizes will be awarded and attendees will learn how to access time-limited videos.

The conference will begin with an overview of the day’s event as well as key information attendees will need to know.

The keynote speaker is Charlie Hall, Ph.D., Professor and Ellison Chair at the Texas A&M Department of Horticultural Sciences, Bryan-College Station. He will present “The benefits of plants for the education and well-being of young people”.

It will cover the growing mountain of research, which continues to document the specific benefits of a connection to plants and nature for young people’s learning and testing success, emotional and mental health, social life skills and Moreover.

The first part will cover the preparation, installation, maintenance, planting and harvesting of the garden. The second track explores successful volunteers, funding, partnerships, programs and school gardens.

The first track is “Hands in the Dirt: Garden How-To”. The topics and speakers are as follows:

  • Location and Design Options – William Isbell, Harris County Master Gardener.
  • Make it grow! Soil, seeds and plants — Skip Richter, AgriLife Extension horticulturist, Brazos County.
  • Vegetables for Fall and Spring Gardens – Smith.
  • Just Add Water: Irrigation Considerations — Boone Holladay, AgriLife Extension Horticulturist, Fort Bend County.
  • The Good Guys in the Garden: Knowing and Attracting Beneficial Insects – Paul Winski, Horticulturist AgriLife Extension, Harris County.
  • Planning a Well-Kept Garden — Stephen Brueggerhoff, AgriLife Extension Horticulturist, Galveston County.
  • The focus of Track 2 is “Administration and Support: Funding, Resource Development and Curriculum”. The topics and speakers are as follows:
  • Building a Support Team: Partners and Partnerships – Brandi Keller, AgriLife Extension Horticulturist, Harris County.
  • Managing students in the garden – Martha McLeod, science teacher at Fulton Learning Center, Aransas County.
  • Strategies for Financing Your Garden — Randy Seagraves, AgriLife Extension Horticulture Specialist, Bryan-College Station.
  • STEM and Literature in the Garden – Lisa Whittlesey, AgriLife Extension Program Specialist and Junior Master Gardener Program International Coordinator, Bryan-College Station.
  • School Garden Success Stories — Garden tours of several school gardens with speakers discussing their garden success stories and how they overcame challenges.
  • Health and Wellness: The Nutrition Connection — speakers will include Caren Walton, AgriLife Extension horticultural program specialist, and Learn, Grow, Eat and Go! program team members.
]]>
Small or apartment gardening options https://clarencehouse-hotel.co.uk/small-or-apartment-gardening-options/ Fri, 01 Jul 2022 13:00:00 +0000 https://clarencehouse-hotel.co.uk/small-or-apartment-gardening-options/ Going from a large garden to the space available in a smaller house or apartment can be a difficult adjustment. In order to make this transition as easy as possible, it is important to consider the different options available and find the one that suits your desired garden. At a certain point in life, maintaining […]]]>

Going from a large garden to the space available in a smaller house or apartment can be a difficult adjustment. In order to make this transition as easy as possible, it is important to consider the different options available and find the one that suits your desired garden.

At a certain point in life, maintaining an entire home, yard and gardens can become too much to handle. Downsizing, while necessary and helpful, can significantly reduce the space available for gardening. If someone enjoys gardening, helping plants grow, and reaping the rewards of their efforts, this impact can hit quite hard. Fortunately, there are a number of options available for gardening even in a smaller house or apartment.

balcony gardens

Balcony gardens are a wonderful option for anyone in an apartment with a balcony, but there are many factors to consider before starting such a garden. First of all, the restrictions of the building, as well as the comfort of the neighbors must be taken into account. Not all apartment buildings allow balcony gardens, as growing plants may attract birds and pests. It is also best to ensure that a balcony garden does not disturb other tenants, especially those under the garden during watering times.

If a balcony garden proves to be a viable option, plant planning comes into play. Not all balconies are the same size or face the same direction. When choosing plants to grow, it is important to consider the amount of sunlight that hits the balcony, as well as the amount of space available. With careful planning, plants that will thrive in the specific conditions of each balcony can be chosen.

Community gardens

If an allotment garden is not an option, community gardens are available in many cities. These gardens bring members of a community together as they work to cultivate a variety of edible plants and herbs that can be enjoyed by every member of the group. Most community gardens allow members to rent a plot, grow their own plants and reap the benefits.

Although each garden is organized and managed differently, they all provide an opportunity for those with a green thumb to dig in the dirt and have some gardening fun. With the aim of providing the community with fresh and accessible products, these gardens allow everyone to access them at a relatively low price. This makes a community garden not only a place to enjoy gardening and build community bonds, but also to save money while enjoying fresh, local produce.

window gardens

Although much smaller than other options, window gardens allow those short on space to maintain their gardening habits. Small hanging boxes or even window sill collections make it easier to maintain and grow certain plants, even in limited space.

As these gardens are often small, it is important to choose plants that do not require a lot of root space, as small planters may not have room for them. Otherwise, the same restrictions that apply to balcony gardens, regarding plants and building regulations, must also be taken into account.

Gardening is an enjoyable and relaxing hobby that should not be given up as the available space has shrunk. By taking the time to consider all available options and planning an allocated space, a scaled down garden can be just as enjoyable as the full size original.

]]>
Registration in progress for the preliminary master gardener training https://clarencehouse-hotel.co.uk/registration-in-progress-for-the-preliminary-master-gardener-training/ Tue, 28 Jun 2022 21:05:07 +0000 https://clarencehouse-hotel.co.uk/registration-in-progress-for-the-preliminary-master-gardener-training/ For those looking to hone their landscaping skills or who might be interested in becoming a volunteer master gardener, now is the time to enroll in the Home Horticulture Certificate Program., offered online, August 4 through September 29, by the University of Nevada, Reno Extension. Various topics will be covered, such as soils and plant […]]]>

For those looking to hone their landscaping skills or who might be interested in becoming a volunteer master gardener, now is the time to enroll in the Home Horticulture Certificate Program., offered online, August 4 through September 29, by the University of Nevada, Reno Extension.

Various topics will be covered, such as soils and plant nutrients, composting, native plants, berries, and integrated pest management. The cost is $275 and includes recorded lectures, readings, assignments, and online Q&A sessions with local gardening experts and professionals. Online sessions will take place via Zoom every Thursday, from 12 p.m. to 1 p.m. The program will end with a final exam.

“We’ve expanded these programs to be available in every county in Nevada by putting them online.” Statewide Master Gardener Coordinator Katelyn Brinkerhoff said. “The training now includes materials, lectures and live sessions that will be available virtually and applicable to anyone looking to start or learn more about gardening in the state.”

Apart from the program being a solid education for those who simply wish to expand their knowledge of horticulture to tend to their own landscapes and gardens, the Home Horticulture Certificate Program is also a prerequisite for those wishing to continue their education. to become a Certified Nevada Master Gardener.

Master gardeners receive further training and volunteer their time to provide information about horticulture and gardening to others and enrich the horticultural life of their communities. After completing their first year, Master Gardeners have an annual commitment of 10 hours of continuing education and 20 hours of volunteer work where their knowledge and skills best match the needs of the community, including responding to inquiries by telephone and e-mail, maintain booths at fairs and home shows, organize educational presentations. , and consultation in school and community gardens.

Application for the Master Gardener Training Program will be opened after participants pass the final exam for the Home Horticulture Certification Program. The training will cost $25 and will run from October 27 to December 8. Readings, lectures and live Q&A sessions will take place online, while county-specific in-person activities may also be added to the schedule.

Registration for the Home Horticulture Certificate Program is open until July 17 and can be completed online.

For course information, email Brinkerhoff. Individuals requiring special accommodations or assistance should call or notify Paul Lessick, Civil Rights and Compliance Coordinator, at plessick@unr.edu or 702-257-5577 at least three days prior to the scheduled event.

]]>